Quite unintentionally, this site became dedicated to the talented and surprising Michelle Dockery. My aim is to provide fresh material and perspective for her fans.

In the 'Michelle Dockery Professional Archive' link below you will find the most complete collection of her screen performances on the internet.

I am based in California.

 

"Off-screen, Michelle will be having a pyjama party this Christmas, with her sisters at home in Essex, where she was born and brought up - and spent two years working in a pie and mash shop (‘I never tried the eels,’ she says with a shudder)."

I knew had to hunt down some jellied eels ever since I learned about this classic East London working class dish. It looks scary, but what the hell, I was never a finicky eater.

Turns out finding a pie and eel shop was no simple matter. They may be common in Essex, but  they aren’t ubiquitous in London. I started looking in the Docklands, that part of East London where jellied eels was a way of life for centuries. After walking around for hours I found not a single shop. Instead my hunt for the jellied eel turned into a lesson in Docklands history. Much of it is now gentrified with high value condos overlooking the old docks. The working class community mostly moved out when the ships stopped docking here and were replaced by African and Middle Eastern immigrants with their own cuisines, needless to say none of the new comers wanted anything to do with jellied eels. I had a nice kabob instead.

To make a long story short I found a few shops with the help of Google and picked an especially working class shop to have my pie and mash and jellied eel combo. The former would be familiar to the American palate, but the eel was quite challenging. The first bite I’m happy to report was not bad at all. Cold, salty, fishy, but not that intimidating. It was one thing to take a bite, but the prospect of having to eat it all quickly flagged my enthusiasm. If only the portions were smaller.

Just as I was giving up, the nice old lady who runs the place came to explain how Cockney old timers did it. You had to liberally apply vinegar and white pepper. This made all the difference as it greatly reduced the fishy taste and added complexity to the flavor. I ended up eating most of it, but was glad to turn my attention to the mash and pie.  

Would I try the eels again? Probably not. In my opinion you can’t beat Japanese unadon when it comes to making a meal of eel. But I’m glad I had it. This is a real piece of history, one that’s fading fast. Looking around the pie shop with its decades old decor and peeling paint job, the only customers ordering eel other than me were in their seventies. A decade from now, jellied eels will probably only be found in overpriced restaurants that cater to curious tourists.

"Off-screen, Michelle will be having a pyjama party this Christmas, with her sisters at home in Essex, where she was born and brought up - and spent two years working in a pie and mash shop (‘I never tried the eels,’ she says with a shudder)."

I knew had to hunt down some jellied eels ever since I learned about this classic East London working class dish. It looks scary, but what the hell, I was never a finicky eater.

Turns out finding a pie and eel shop was no simple matter. They may be common in Essex, but they aren’t ubiquitous in London. I started looking in the Docklands, that part of East London where jellied eels was a way of life for centuries. After walking around for hours I found not a single shop. Instead my hunt for the jellied eel turned into a lesson in Docklands history. Much of it is now gentrified with high value condos overlooking the old docks. The working class community mostly moved out when the ships stopped docking here and were replaced by African and Middle Eastern immigrants with their own cuisines, needless to say none of the new comers wanted anything to do with jellied eels. I had a nice kabob instead.

To make a long story short I found a few shops with the help of Google and picked an especially working class shop to have my pie and mash and jellied eel combo. The former would be familiar to the American palate, but the eel was quite challenging. The first bite I’m happy to report was not bad at all. Cold, salty, fishy, but not that intimidating. It was one thing to take a bite, but the prospect of having to eat it all quickly flagged my enthusiasm. If only the portions were smaller.

Just as I was giving up, the nice old lady who runs the place came to explain how Cockney old timers did it. You had to liberally apply vinegar and white pepper. This made all the difference as it greatly reduced the fishy taste and added complexity to the flavor. I ended up eating most of it, but was glad to turn my attention to the mash and pie.

Would I try the eels again? Probably not. In my opinion you can’t beat Japanese unadon when it comes to making a meal of eel. But I’m glad I had it. This is a real piece of history, one that’s fading fast. Looking around the pie shop with its decades old decor and peeling paint job, the only customers ordering eel other than me were in their seventies. A decade from now, jellied eels will probably only be found in overpriced restaurants that cater to curious tourists.

"Best meal you’ve had?

Bob Bob Ricard, for the chocolate bombe thing at the end. I love that place.

— Michelle Dockery”

I wish I had a “before” picture, but this dessert is a gold dust covered hollow chocolate ball filled with chocolate mousse loaded with goodies. It comes to the table looking like a Faberge egg. The waiter then pours hot chocolate syrup causing the top to slowly cave in, revealing the filling. The raspberries are also topped with gold flakes. Not sure I want to make a habit of eating gold though.

Bob Bob Ricard is a pretty pricey restaurant in SOHO. It was started by two men, a Russian named Bob and a Frenchman named Ricard. There are two Bobs in the name because he invested more money. If you’re catching a show in the West End this restaurant is perfect for a pre-show meal. The service was phenomenal.

"Best meal you’ve had?

Bob Bob Ricard, for the chocolate bombe thing at the end. I love that place.

— Michelle Dockery”

I wish I had a “before” picture, but this dessert is a gold dust covered hollow chocolate ball filled with chocolate mousse loaded with goodies. It comes to the table looking like a Faberge egg. The waiter then pours hot chocolate syrup causing the top to slowly cave in, revealing the filling. The raspberries are also topped with gold flakes. Not sure I want to make a habit of eating gold though.

Bob Bob Ricard is a pretty pricey restaurant in SOHO. It was started by two men, a Russian named Bob and a Frenchman named Ricard. There are two Bobs in the name because he invested more money. If you’re catching a show in the West End this restaurant is perfect for a pre-show meal. The service was phenomenal.

Anonymous asked
You know that the Dockers/Chanel shirt is just a shirt made and sent by an obsessed fan right?

Seems like everyone is pretty happy with it. Made me smile anyways.  


@theladydockers: YES!! Thank you @Ailesh_ for this! Ladies… @laurabrown99 @houseoferlanger #howcoolisthis?!

@theladydockers: YES!! Thank you @Ailesh_ for this! Ladies… @laurabrown99 @houseoferlanger #howcoolisthis?!

the-dockmeister-general:

I just died. Yes that’s my tshirt design on Laura Browns Instagram. Yes Michelle follows her. Yes Micaela is commenting on it. Yes I’m tagged. Yes she says I’m clever. Yes they referenced the little tags that came with them.

& No, I’m not ok

Man this was a long time coming, congrats.

I’m on vacation again, but I’ll try to update when possible.

Be excellent to each other.

muchadoaboutroyals asked
if DA series 4 eligible for this year's Emmy? I hope Dockery wins this year and the other actors get acting nominations. They totally deserve it!

The 66th Emmy nomination announcement will take place July 10th, about a month before the awards. I haven’t heard any rumors yet, but Michelle was very strong in Series 4, it may be her best chance as an Emmy hopeful on this show. It’s always a long shot for the cast because Downton is an ensemble show, all the more remarkable that they are able to stand out. Fingers crossed.